Inter-IPX

Introduction

AMS-IX offers an Inter-IPX service with a supporting Service Level Agreement (SLA) to IPX Providers. This page gives a background of the service and describes the main components and characteristics. For prices go to the Mobile peering pricing page

The AMS-IX Inter-IPX Service

The AMS-IX Inter-IPX service is primarily an extension of what AMS-IX already does best, i.e. the offering of a carrier-grade interconnect solution, but in this case with a commitment to certain service levels as required in an IPX environment: AMS-IX offers its own Inter-IPX SLA, compliant with GSMA's IPX PCI document PTG-DL017.

Interconnectingipxproviders

Figure 3. AMS-IX Inter-IPX Service: interconnecting IPX Providers, and in the future possibly also content (delivery) parties, at the Inter-IPX exchange.

Setup and Commitment to KPI-levels

AMS-IX supports the separation of IPX service communities as described in GSMA's IR.34 by offering separate Inter-IPX VLANs. Think of IPX Diameter, IPX transport, and also GRX. For this AMS-IX defines dedicated VPLS instances to separate these logically from the other VPLS instances that are operated by AMS-IX such as the Internet service. Each Inter-IPX connection will be configured in one or more Inter-IPX VPLS instances so that each IPX provider can reach the other interconnected IPX providers inside the relevant service communities.

I Ipx New Vlans

Technically the interconnection between an IPX provider and the AMS-IX Inter-IPX service will be implemented as a fully redundant connection to the AMS-IX platform. There will be a minimum of two physically separated links, which terminate in separate certified AMS-IX colocation facilities.

Inter Ipx Platform

Figure 4: Inter-IPX connections and probe set-up in the AMS-IX Inter-IPX platform. The AMS-IX patch panel is the demarcation point for responsibility.

The AMS-IX Inter-IPX service levels will be measured between probes connected to every access router that parties in the Inter-IPX VLANs. See Figure 4. Each probe measures between all other probes the following Key Performance Indicators (KPIs):

  • Service availability
  • Packet loss
  • One way delay
  • One way delay variation (‘jitter’)

Since AMS-IX is agnostic with regard to the traffic that parties exchange with each other, service class differentiation will not be provided by AMS-IX: DSCP values in the packets that enter the Inter-IPX VLANs will be left untouched. AMS-IX commits itself to the highest, i.e. ‘conversational’, service class as defined by the GSMA (see GSMA IREG PRD IR.34) for the aforementioned KPIs, regardless of the services exchanged between IPX Providers. Reporting of statistics will be real-time through the AMS-IX member portal and once a month as a summary to prove SLA performance.

The aim of the service availability is 99.995% per month.

The AMS-IX Infrastructure is considered degraded if one of the measured KPIs between one Inter-IPX customer and another Inter-IPX customer is experienced at a rate larger than the aimed service level. The monitored and measured KPI with their target values are:

KPI Target value Description
Packet loss <0.05% Average per hour in a 24 hour period
One way delay <500 micro-seconds Average per hour in a 24 hour period
One way delay variation <100 micro-seconds Average per hour in a 24 hour period


Inter-IPX Service Description: Inter-IPX Connections

AMS-IX will provide an SLA to IPX Providers on their Inter-IPX connections to the AMS-IX infrastructure. This agreement is applicable to availability of these connections as well as to the performance of the traffic exchanged in the Inter-IPX environment within the AMS-IX infrastructure. See for further details on the relevant KPIs the AMS-IX Inter-IPX SLA .

An Inter-IPX connection consists of two redundant regular AMS-IX connections and can be one of the following:

  • A set of two Single GE connections on two different certified AMS-IX locations (see the page on colocation)
  • A set of two Multiple GE connections in a so-called link-aggregated (‘LAG’) configuration, of which one set individually is considered one regular connection, on two different certified AMS-IX locations (one LAG at one location the other LAG at another location)*
  • A set of two Single 10GE connection on two different certified AMS-IX locations
  • A set of two Multiple 10GE connections in a so-called LAG configuration, of which one set individually is considered one regular connection, on two different certified AMS-IX locations (one LAG at one location the other LAG at another location).

The customer Inter-IPX connections are terminated on the AMS-IX patch panel. This patch panel is the demarcation point between the customer and AMS-IX. Once again, see Figure 4 for a schematic layout of the setup. The responsibility for the (LAG) connection between the customer router and the AMS-IX patch panel is with the customer. The responsibility for the (LAG) connection from the AMS-IX patch panel is with AMS-IX.